Let’s Play Hide the Plywood

 

This is from my initial assessment.

In photo #2- Do you see the same problem I see?

I was called to a home in Rochester (actually I was emailed to visit this home)to examine recently revealed rot and offer solutions.This home has a second story roof overhang that is almost four feet deep. The homeowner started to find some problems when he ripped up the cement pad that was underneath the entire overhang. The columns had entirely rotted at the bottoms – the home was built before pressure treated wood- so we replaced them. We also replaced all of the fascias with pvc trim and installed seamless gutters and leafguards to manage the water. This proactive homeowner also found some soft and punky plywood after removing some of the siding, himself, to see what was going on.

In photo #2 you’ll see that the major problem I identified was the lack of elevation between the finish grade under the overhang and the wood framing, plywood, and siding. The current building code calls for a minimum of 8″ of exposed masonry between finish grade and framing and plywood. This is to protect the home from water damage and insect damage. With the extra wide roof overhang, there is little threat from water, but major threat from insects. The reason there was no prior insect damage was because the concrete pad was poured right up to the siding. When you’ve seen the devastating damage an underground colony of termites can silently wreak on the framing of a home, you evaluate these situations from a different angle.

In this drawing that I scanned and included with my original work proposal you’ll see 2 things: First, the solution that I’ve been using for a few years now to solve this type of problem; and second, my pre-K art skills not so proudly on display! The foam gasket and the bead of caulking work together to try to form an airtight seal to keep the bugs out. Additionally, we’re wrapping the bottom edge of the plywood with ice and water shield in order to hide the plywood from the insects. I’m no entymologist, but I assume that insects will be far less likely to begin nibbling away at petroleum based products like ice and water shield. The foam gasket must be buried under the ice and water shield. I’ve seen carpenter ants eat away an entire wall’s worth of 1/2″ foam board that lay directly under the siding. The only evidence remaining to prove that it ever existed was the foil facing.

Photo #3- We could stand to add some insulation, since the wall was opened up anyhow.

Photo #4- Insulation beefed up and ready to continue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #5

In photo #5, we applied the 7/16″ x 1″ wide foam gasket to the bottom edge of the back side of the plywood. We then began to wrap the bottom edge in ice and water shield. What I did was to gently pre-slice the paper on the back side of the ice and water shield so that I could stick it to the back of the ply and to the foam, but leave the protective paper on the part that will wrap up the front face of the ply.

In photo #6 you’ll see the back edge of the ply wrapped with ice and water shield up and over the foam gasket.

Photo #7

In photo # 7 this is the installation of said plywood panels. Notice I ran the ice and water shield past the first piece of ply, so that I could have good overlapping with the next piece. The process calls for smearing the bottom edge of the ply into a thick bead of high grade caulking. In this case, the local lumberyard didn’t carry Lexel brand caulking (in my opinion the most bad posterior caulking available), so that means 2 things: First, we used Phenoseal translucent caulking (goes on white and dries translucent); second, Ricci Lumber needs to think about opening a satellite location in Rochester, or I need to plan ahead and schedule for them to deliver my sundries along with the lumber order next time. Phenoseal is also amazing, it has my 110% confidence.

Photo #8

 

In photo # 8, note that it’s important to nail the bottom edge of the ply approximately every 6″. Also, remember to set the depth of the nail gun so that the nails don’t just blow 1/2 way through the plywood.

 

By John Bradshaw

Photo #9- Peel off the remaining paper and stick the ice and water shield to the face.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #10- Finish the prep with more ice and water shield tucked all the way underneath components that are directly above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #11- Pvc trimboard installation with hidden fasteners. We also installed proper flashing above the trimboard and replaced siding above that. All that’s left now is touch up paint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finished product from the road. The homeowner can finish his hardscaping now, sorry Rich.

In summary, when repairing rot in New England, or elsewhere, we must evaluate whether standard operating procedure will suffice. In this case, just nailing up plywood would handle the repair, but not protect the home for the long term. Invest the extra effort to think about and evaluate what forces will be working against the project in the future. Then, find or create the solution that will stand against these forces. It’s an investment you will not regret.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Timeless Solution to Age Old Problem

Know anybody with wooden gutters? Chances are they enjoy talking about the character and beauty of them, but don’t want the conversation to sway towards the

Rye Beach NH contractor

This was from my initial assessment of the home.

maintenance of them. They do have many checkmarks in the “pros” column for the aesthetic appeal, but each “pro” is also offset but a baneful “con”.

I was referred to these particular homeowners in Rye, NH to replace rotten eave trim and porch trim before having their house painted. Upon arrival I asked the homeowner what his wishes were and what his analysis was, since they have owned the home for 26 years. I then applied this perspective and my professional perspective as I walked the exterior of the house, took measurements and

Home repair Rye NH

This was the typical rotten trim we were asked to estimate. Clearly we were going to have to replicate some ornamental brackets.

pictures, and made notations. I returned to discuss my findings and display pictures with the homeowner. I told him that we could certainly replace all of the rotten trimwork, replicate a couple of the decorative cornice brackets, and tighten things up ahead of a paint job. Unfortunately, I also had to gently disclose that it seemed clear that the wooden gutters were causing the rot all around the home, and it was likely to continue. I asked what his thoughts were about this and he

Wood gutter repair

It can’t be good when my chubby finger can fit into the joint.

remarked, “I’ve resigned myself to the fact that rot is just going to continue to be a problem.” These particular homeowners are very intelligent and do an outstanding job trying to maintain the integrity of the home. I feel as though this response was a result of decades of conditioning by previous contractors stating exactly that. I also had to gently state that I didn’t share this same viewpoint with regards to this specific example, and that after providing a detailed proposal for replacing the rotten wood trim, I would also research to find a winning solution for conquering the age old wooden gutter problem.

By looking at these pictures, you can see that the gutters are placed over the fascia board, but starting to pull away. This creates a wonderful alternative for water seeking to hide. All of the joints in the gutters have separated like Heidi Klum and Seal, no chance of getting back together.

Wood gutter repair Rye, NH

Water definitely should not be allowed behind this gutter.

Compounding the problems greatly, one of my predecessors decided to resolve the issue of gutters pulling away by supporting them with another layer of wood trim applied to the fascia underneath the gutter, and then sealed it together with caulking and paint. While this looked terrific from the ground, it didn’t work out so well from a “water management” perspective. All of the moisture that ran behind the gutter was sealed in with no place to go. Of course it rotted the trimwork, layer by layer. If all this wasn’t bad enough, some of the original downspouts were eliminated and patched over for aesthetic reasons. Fine, except that the gutter still pitched in that direction and now the water would sit there until it evaporated. Another detail requiring attention was where the gutter sections butted into the exterior walls and siding. There was no endcap sealed on to the butt end of the gutter, nothing to protect the wall from this moisture. I showed the homeowner all of these pics and more, so he could see why I felt it deserved attention.

Finding the winning solution wasn’t so easy. I spent 2 full days talking with other building professionals, talking to the local suppliers of gutter and roofing products, in professional chatrooms, and spending countless hours poring through Google search results. The end result: There was no ready made solution. I was going to have to create one. We could have copper manufactured and soldered to be seamless in place, for over $8,000. Or we could use white rubber roofing and lead for ½ the price.

In order for the gutter to hold the water and direct it properly into the downspouts, we had to ensure that the white rubber roofing liner would be tucked all the way up under the roof-line. Then, we had to find a way to seal the rubber roofing to the top edge of

Wood gutter repair

Time to start putting things back together.

the gutter, where it wouldn’t be seen from the ground. By nailing the lead to the gutter, it gave us a nice, clean, smooth, and impermeable surface to bond the rubber roofing to… for all eternity, ahh, ahh, ahh. But, there was one more critical task we were going to ask the lead to perform. We needed to create a “drip edge” on the outside face of the gutter for overflow water to drip off of, rather than submit to it’s surface tension

Wood gutter lining Rye, NH

Installing the rubber membrane under the roof drip edge and sticking to the gutter and the lead at the top edge of the gutter. All edges will need to be sealed with lap sealant engineered for rubber roofing membranes.

and run all the way down the face of the building components. We did this by adding a

Wood gutter liner

The finished product isn’t so glamorous up close, but looks great from the ground.

spacer to the top outer edge of the gutter and then hanging the lead slightly lower than it. We also added 3 new downspouts where the demand required.

I’m 100% certain that Meticulous Remodeling had not just boldly gone where no man has gone before, but proud of our extra effort and craftsmanship, nonetheless.

 

By John Bradshaw

Wood trim repair Rye Beach, NH

Instead of using solid cedar which would crack and split, we used weatherproof glue to join cedar boards for a more stable product.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home repair Rye, NH

This is the finish painted product as seen from the ground. You may notice the unpainted lead at the top edge. Also, the bracket on the left is a new one.