Solar Powered Roof Fans in York, ME

I was recently contacted by a woman from Georgia that had found me on Angie’s List about helping alleviate unbearable summer heat in the upstairs bedrooms of her family’s cottage on York Beach, Maine. The cottage has been in the family for generations and she recalled lying in sweat as a kid, trying to get to sleep after the upstairs had been collecting heat all day long. She asked what suggestions I had to help the comfort levels of renting guests. I suggested the good ‘ole wind turbine. Why not?

Well, when I was researching the wind turbines to calculate the approximate cost of the project I decided to dig a little deeper and see how much air these things can really move, knowing the massive task it was needed to do. It turns out that some of them don’t spin that well at all, and the ones that do don’t move a ton of air.

Next, I came across the solar powered roof fans. It seems that there is much price fluctuation ranging from $90 to $500. Many reviews claimed that the more affordable ones felt flimsy and cheap. The last thing I want is to spend a client’s money and for them to not be happy with the performance of the product over a long period of time. I searched for highest rated solar roof fans and came across the U.S. Sunlight model 9910TR. They were about $300 a piece and eligible for a tax credit of up to 30% of the price of the units, before installation. Once shipped to my home, I took it out of the box to familiarize myself before installation day. I was amazed at how well it met the main secondary criteria: It was so quiet that I could hardly even tell it was running while I held in my hands up to the sun.

We decided to install two: One in the largest bedroom; and one for the 2 other bedrooms to share. Here in New England, you’ll want to install them on either a south or west facing roof plane. We got lucky and have a roof plane that faces due southwest. Once installed, I waited until about 1:00 pm to adjust the rotation and tilt of the solar panel to about dead perpendicular to the sun.

From the inside, drive a screw through the roof for locating on the outside, and then protect from the mess with a drop cloth.

The fans seem to work very well, not requiring any wiring of any sort. During the heat of the day, I could easily feel the air blowing on me from the fans while I was working on the roof. They are sun activated- so when the sun hits the solar panel, the fan moves. When it’s overcast or cloudy, it slows. For our purposes, we knew it wasn’t going to be like central a/c, but wanted to keep the bedrooms tucked up under the roof from ever getting so darn hot that they can’t cool down.

Strip back the shingles and set aside for re-use, then cut the hole with a jig saw. Notice the drop cloth caught the debris.

I got the both of them installed in one long day. We may opt to install an optional thermal switch that ensures the unit runs only when the attic temperature hits 80 degrees. This will prevent the fan from running during the winter, thus prolonging the life of the fan. I’ll keep you posted as I hear feedback from the clients.

 

 

 

 

This is the final product! The shingles were a little brittle, and being right on the coast we decided to glue them back down as well as nailing.

 

 

 

 

 

 

From the inside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do It Yourself Concrete Wall Insulation

 

Every now and then we have to insulate the inside of a foundation wall. Concrete walls have zero insulation value, according to the building code. In our cold sector of the country, we have to insulate walls to an R-Value of 21. I recently had just such an occasion, to insulate a concrete foundation wall in a home that we were remodeling in Rye, NH.

You see, this foundation was built as part of an addition, some years ago. It seems that whomever built this addition didn’t pay quite enough attention to the little details. There are water pipes running through this utility area, with no insulation on these concrete walls and no heat source. What do you suppose happened to those water pipes this winter? They sure did freeze, unfortunately.

See how close the water pipes are to the exterior rim band? On the other side of that 2″ thick foam piece that we sealed around the edges of lie below freezing temps.

What did we do about it? Well, we decided to make this utility area of this addition warm. We started by determining what the vulnerabilities are, and then convert them into strengths. The rim band of the floor framing (where floor joists terminate over an exterior wall, in this case foundation wall) is a typical vulnerability. This one’s no different. We decided to use standard 2″ blue foam insulation board and fit it into these spaces between the joists. We then seal around it with the spray foam gun.

The next and only other major vulnerability is the concrete foundation. In this case, the foundation walls are exposed entirely to the elements on the other side, no earth for insulation purposes. So, if these concrete walls essentially have no insulation value, let’s rectify that. I chose to walk a nice balance between frugality and functionality. We wanted to keep the cold out and the heat in, but without spending a fortune. We also want to provide a safe finished product. Leaving most foam board products exposed would be unsafe and a code violation. They will easily ignite. I didn’t want to have to sheetrock or put plywood over the foamboard, so I decided to upgrade to Dow Thermax. You’ll have to research whether this can be left exposed in your municipality, but I chose to go with it here.

We start by applying adhesive to insulation pins. The adhesive is made specifically for this purpose and emits rather potent fumes, so take precautions. After letting the pins cure to the concrete overnight or so, it’s now time to cut and fit the insulation board onto the pins. We air seal the perimeter of each sheet with the fire resistant foam from the foam gun, and we’ve just sealed out the cold. We opted to only go with 2″ foam, which now gives our wall an R-Value of approximately 13. Not quite up to code for new construction, but probably about 500% better than it was. Also, we weren’t required to adhere to building code because we didn’t need a permit for a repair of this nature.

 

 

Finally, we decided to maximize heat that was already available, instead of install a new heat source. We cut a nice hole through the plywood that had been used to block in an old foundation window dating from before the addition. On the other side of this plywood window, there is a wall mounted on demand boiler hot water heater. The heat transmitted from the existing mechanical room was ample enough to supply the previously cold, adjacent room.

Eldredge Lumber in York, Maine carries the Thermax insulation for around $60 per 4′ x 8′ sheet, and Ricci Lumber in Portsmouth, NH special ordered in the pins and adhesive. The minimum order was 1,000 insulation pins, and we used a quart of adhesive. The total for these 2 items was under $200. We air sealed the edges of all the panels with a fire retardant spray foam from a can. We used 6 sheets of the foam insulation for the concrete walls, and 2 sheets for the rim band where the floor joists meet the exterior wall. Super simple, you can do it!!!

“Mahogany” Window Sill Repair

This is the condition of the pine trim repair after just a few years.

Many of our customers in Rollinsford, Portsmouth, Rye, Newcastle, and Rye Beach, NH, and South Berwick, ME have gorgeous historic homes. Some of these clients are open to the idea of pvc trim replacement for rot prone areas and some would prefer to stick with good old fashioned wood. What’s our official Meticulous position when asked if

The building envelope was well done. My predecessor had used a self adhering and self sealing membrane to keep the water from getting into the house. This is also what the bead of caulking looked like before we screwed the new sill nosing into place.

we prefer to use wood or pvc? Our answer is a resounding “Yes.” We would prefer to use wood or pvc, as opposed to…I don’t know, cardboard.

We can’t escape the understanding that there are many benefits of using pvc to replace rotten exterior trim. We also understand that today’s pine is absolutely NOT an option for longevity. But using pvc trim will never be the same experience, for a carpenter, as working with wood.

This is the profile of the new nosing. The rear notch at the top edge is to account for fitting around a lip on the window unit. The notch on the bottom rear edge is to fit over the siding, properly overlapping. The middle groove on the bottom edge is called a rain drip. This is to create an edge for the water to drip from before traveling further back to the siding.

We recently consulted with a great do it yourself homeowner in historic South Portsmouth, NH. Not long ago, he had replaced window sill nosings on the east face of his home that takes a brutal beating from mother nature, being only a couple dozen yards from the river. The work he did was with pine, unfortunately, so it didn’t take long to rot again. He wanted to stay away from pvc and asked what else we could offer. I suggested the solid but pricey “Mahogany.” I wrap this in quotations because I actually purchased a product called Red Meranti at Selectwood in Portsmouth. The way that I understand it, Red Meranti is not actual Mahogany, although is commonly referred to as Mahogany. Actual Mahogany is increasingly rare due to the strict forestry controls put in place after decades of over-harvesting in South America. Red Meranti hails primarily from Indonesia and Malaysia and is a nice solid, stable, insect and decay resistant choice for a sill nosing application, not to mention dense enough to not absorb tons of water. People often ask about cedar. I stay away from cedar in this application because cedar is a very soft wood and has an open grain structure. In my opinion, cedar readily absorbs water, even though it has the ability to resist rotting better than many species. Red cedar is much easier to work with because it’s lighter and softer and thus doesn’t require pre-drilling, but because sill nosings take a beating, I think Red Meranti’s density and close grain structure make it a superior choice.

Small trim screws through the face for holding power. There IS clear primer on this before installation, and notice the intentional bead of caulking to bond the trim to the bottom edge of the window.

In this instance, we were working on a wall system that was already well waterproofed. All we had to do was focus on doing the carpentry repair in a manner to stand the test of time… and the elements. Once we had test fitted the sill nosings to be splendid, we opted to use a higher-end primer that does a nice job of blocking the tannins from the Meranti from bleeding through the paint down the road. We chose to use a product called Trim Magic by manufacturer XIM. This bonding primer adheres very well and also does a nice job of blocking the tannin bleed. It goes on milky white and dries clear to milky white. The nosings don’t appear to be primed, but certainly are on all edges before installation.

We also tried to do the painter a favor and put a quick coat of white exterior paint inside of the bottom notch before installation makes this very difficult to do.

Today’s breeds of windows don’t really have a sloped window sill or a sill that notches out over the face of the siding underneath. So, even though the building envelope underneath was very well done, we still want to keep the water traveling out over the face of the siding. Because the bottom of the window unit is completely flat, we want to bond the new trim to the bottom edge of the window and stay bonded, so water doesn’t run in behind the nosing. This can’t be done by just a nice tight carpentry fit, so we have to leave a touch of a gap to bond the two with a tri-polymer caulking. Like I’ve said in the past, our favorite caulking is Lexel. By the way, did you know that tri-polymers are self-healing? This is because they stay so permanently flexible and gooey that if a bead of this caulking gets sliced somehow, the two ends will bond back together if they just touch. What’s next, are they going to start making cars that can parallel park themselves, or something?

Yes, we do prefer to do these repairs in wood or pvc. There are lots of pros and cons for each. Sometimes pvc is just a no-brainer; sometimes the pvc doesn’t make any sense. If we’re going to use wood, we just want to think about what species to use for the occasion. Cheery-O!

 

Common Repair in New England Architecture

 

Before.

One of the mainstays of quintessential New England architecture is the “Colonial” style home. We also see a terrific array of “Greek Revival” homes. Both of these styles may have some common architectural features, including cornice details. I suppose it may be prudent to start with a quick discussion about nomenclature. The “rake” line of a

Things are starting to pull away.

gable wall refers to the trim running up the angle of the roof. In this case, there is a rake overhang. The bottom portion of this particular rake overhang intersects with the fascia and soffit at the eave line and then “returns” back to the wall section away from the fascia and gutters at the eave line. This small and almost flat section is called a “rake return.”

After tucking the seamless lead flashing, we anchored the new frame in place.

The rake return is a detail that very commonly requires a little bit of TLC here in NE. Way back when, these details were often built using antique heart pine, exponentially denser and more stable than the garbage available today. It would have been painted in an

oil based paint that allows the wood to breathe and moisture to escape through the paint. Today’s latex paints don’t afford that luxury, but are much more environmentally friendly. Sometimes, they would cover the rake return with tin or even lead. This would usually last a century…not bad.

Ready for paint.

When Meticulous Remodeling is called upon to repair or rebuild a rake return on a historic home, such as the small roof sections here in Portsmouth, NH, there is generally a need to just rebuild it by the time we get there. If we rebuild it, we’ll always anchor the simple framing to the home and to the other framing members with screws, for greater holding power. There are 2 other very critical components to making sure

No more gaps, and with screws as fasteners, there shouldn’t be any in the future.

this project will be bulletproof for another century. First, we must use flashing that will seamlessly cover the entire surface. Second, we must make sure that this lead is seamlessly tucked up in behind the siding board at the house and tucked up in behind the rake soffit that comes down onto it.

For us, this is virtually impossible

Voila!

to do without removing the existing rake return structure to provide access for us to tuck this special order 16″ lead flashing in behind these adjacent planes without tearing it. Once the flashing is in, we’ll then slide the pre-built frame up underneath it and fasten it to the wall. Next, we add trim- in this case we used pvc trim boards. Finally, we might as well paint everything while we’re up there anyway.

Pigeons…enjoy!

PVC Window Trim Replacement

An overwheleming majority of New England homes will have to undergo some sort of rotten exterior trim replacement at some point. One of the most common needs is replacing rotten window casings and sill noses, especially on the north and east faces of a home. This article aims to instruct how to replace your exterior window trim with glued and screwed pvc window trim, in a manner that will withstand the elements.

This Portsmouth home needed rotten exterior trim replaced with something that would hold up, being just a few feet from the river.

This home in Portsmouth, NH was in need of these repairs. Although I have no photos, the first thing to be done is remove the existing window casings and sill nose, gently, so as to not destroy the existing jambs, etc.. I use my Fein reciprocating saw to slice through these components, for easier removal. The sill nose must be trimmed flush with the jambs.

After measuring for the new trim and cutting and labeling the new pieces, it’s time to begin the assembly. The first thing I do is to assemble the bottom of each side window casing to the sill nose. In this case the bevel angle is 15 degrees. The glue we use for pvc welding sets up relatively quickly (in about 5 minutes), so we’ll want to start our screws before applying the glue. Because the sill nose (made by Royal Moldings) is only about 1-1/8″ thick, we can screw from the underside of the nosing into the casing. The rest of the pvc trim is Azek brand.

Make sure not to use so much glue that it oozes out.

 

 

 

 

 

This pvc glue also fits nicely into a carpenter’s tool pouch when on a ladder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the solvent we use for cleaning off any excess glue. Clean it quickly because the glue will “melt” into the face of the trim after a few moments. This is also the cleaner we use for wiping down the trim after final installation, cleaning our dirty paw prints off of it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Window sill and bottom of casings.

 

 

 

 

 

Predrilling the pockets.

For screwing the tops of the casings together, we rely on what’s called a “Kreg” brand pocket screwing kit from the back side of the casings. We first drill the pocket holes for the screws on the back of the side casings. Next, we make sure we’re using the right trims in the right spots, that’s why we mark such as “TR” to mean Top Right corner of the window. Now start the screws into their pocket holes before applying glue. Glue it up, and then use the special clamp and a backer block to protect the face of the trim during clamping. Screw it together and that one’s done!

We now have a pre-assembled window trim package ready to install.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we must prep the face of the window jambs and sill nose before applying the new trim. We use Lexel brand adhesive caulk exclusively for anything that has to hold up to the elements. It has tremendous adhesion, uv resistance, and flexibility. The flexibility is key. You don’t want to use an epoxy paste or

Notice we don’t pre-paint the sill. We want the adhesive and the new trim to bond to solid wood, not to a layer of paint or primer.

anything that won’t move and expand and contract with the movement of the vinyl and wood components. We apply this liberally to the sill nose and bottom portion of the jambs.

 

 

By making sure that there is total caulking squeeze out along the entire seam, we can ensure that the joint will keep water out.

It’s time to install the trim. We use screws for greater holding power to stay bonded tight to the wood. The screws we use are made for pvc trim. They use a special driver to recess the screws into the face of the trim. Then you gently tap a matching pvc plug into the hole, and the hole has vanished! We clean up all the excess caulking using mineral spirits and a clean rag. Remember not to leave solvent soaked rags bunched up

These are the plugs.

in the sun or high heat (like an attic during the summer). The rags will spontaneously combust. Instead, drape the wet rags to dry immediately after use.

Wait, where did the plugs go?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the final product.

Once all the plugs are in, we wipe down the trim with the Goof Off, and then install the storm window and it’s complete. The total time for this project (an easy first story window) is under 3 hours. The total cost for this window was around $200. In this case, the critical joint between the new sill nose and the existing sill is hidden from the majority of the elements behind the storm window. If there is no storm window, I recommend checking the integrity of this joint and re-caulking if necessary every few years, just to err on the side of caution. I warranty this project for ten years, but you can expect it to last much longer.

By John Bradshaw

 

Alternative Paint Prep for Lead Paint

We recently set up in South Berwick to paint 2 sides of this beautiful Queen Anne Victorian that we handle all of the maintenance and improvements for. Painting is not typically what we are called upon to do, but we can certainly provide a quality job.

The best thing to do, of course would be to scrape or grind the paint off down to bare wood. This is cost prohibitive, in this case.

This home/insurance agency is easily 100 years old, and has been very well maintained. It receives very regular exterior paint jobs, so there need not be tons of scraping. This is good news, because for the safety of all, the EPA has begun to enforce very stringent lead paint removal guidelines. Essentially, projects with a lead paint affected area greater than 3′ x 2′ are to be turned into a hazardous waste removal project. I know because we are a Lead Paint certified firm with the EPA.

This has a catastrophic impact on time and budget, but is sometimes unavoidable. The point I’m trying to make, is that if you can accomplish your goals, whatever they may be, in a manner that avoids turning the project into a “The Boy in the Plastic Bubble” type of jobsite, the sometimes stressful remodeling experience may be a bit less painful.

This is an example of a different means to the same end.

This blog post was an afterthought. Therefore, this pic is after applying the Geocel 2310 brushable sealant to it.

Our clients’ goal: To get an affordable coat of paint on the home in order to beautify and protect, for long term results. This is entirely plausible because the home has been maintained with vigilance. It receives semi-constant painting, thus never getting to the point where it needs a paint overhaul.

There are, however, some areas that could use some sort of extra tlc. This built-in bench is one such area. Can we get a durable paint job without turning this into Area 51? Can we do this even considering the alligator skin type of scaling that’s going on now? Yes, of course we can do this.

There’s a product by Geocel called 2310 Brushable Sealant. If you ask the manager, Pat, at Ricci Lumber, he’s been carrying it for 35 years. I haven’t nagged him to verify this for authenticity or exaggeration, but it’s certainly not a newfangled, untested product.

After removing any visibly loose and unbonded paint, the application of the 2310 product is this: You lay it oooonnnn. Now, I don’t mean that you lay it oooonnnn like bringing your best girl home from dinner at the 99′s, turn off all the lights but one, feel around until you bump into the ipod, and turn on a little Barry White… type of lay it oooonnnn. No, no, no. I’m talking you just brought your lady home from a catered picnic on the beach at dusk. You slip into the living room, snap your fingers and the lights going out seem to simultaneously ignite flaming candles at opposite ends of the room. A death glare is flashed, and before you even focus your Jedi mind tricks on the ipod, Barry White is smoothing himself out all over your living room… type of lay it oooonnnn.

This is the final product…and, of course, we still need to paint the decking underneath.

Buuuuhhhht, I digress. What I’m trying to say here is that this isn’t the type of thing you want to rush through. I don’t want to be doing just a little skim coat. I want to lay it on. This product is so goopy that when you apply it properly, it is rather self-leveling. It also has amazing adhesion and flexibility properties. You don’t want to “lay it on” too thick, however. We’re not pouring a bartop here. When you put just enough of it on, it will fill all those alligator cracks and bond the surface. It is not going to look like a brand new bench, but that wouldn’t fit the character of this home anyway. The disclaimer here is that the “self-leveling” and “filling all those alligator cracks” happens while it is wet and not yet fully cured. Once it is fully cured, it has leveled off some of those things, but not nearly as much as what it would seem when wet. That’s ok, though. The main objective is to bond all of the cracked paint so the new coat won’t be a waste of money.

There is another product available that performs the same job of binding the paint. It’s available at the best paint store on the planet: Central Paint in Dover, NH. It’s called “Trim Magic” by a company called XIM. It’s much easier to spread, especially on a larger surface.

Now you see why I’m called “The Michael Jordan of Painting,” and it’s not because I want you to throw me the brush with the game on the line!

I hope that the introduction of of these 2 new products into your toolbox will help you tackle some painting projects to help protect your charming New England home. Don’t forget to follow all of the EPA guidelines when working with lead paint, to protect yourself and others. Also, always wear your safety glasses, don’t forget the hearing protection, brush your teeth after meals, and put on a clean pair of underwear. By the way, why do we say “pair” of underwear?

 

By John Bradshaw

 

 

 

 

Seeing Red

As you look at the roof, the right portion has been pressure washed already, but the right portion not. You can also see that the butt edges of the shakes that have already been washed will need a quick zip over them with the stiff bristle brush. We don’t want to be too aggressive spraying up at these butt edges. Also notice there are a few small shingles under the bottom of the skylight flashing that we’ll have to re-nail. Plan on a little bit of that.

I was recently contracted by a long time homeowner in Newcastle, NH to go through the exterior of his home and look for problems and areas needing attention in anticipation of putting the home on the market in the spring time. He only spent a moment with me, just long enough to mention that he wished he could get the cedar roof replaced for less than $30,000. Then, he left me to evaluate the home and report back.

This assignment threatens me with an anxiety attack every time (fortunately, I’m not prone to anxiety attacks). I never want to tell clients that they have unexpected problems. This home happens to be just a touch over twenty years old, not an era renowned for fine craftsmanship.

Good news: Nothing more than a handful of rotten trimboards, seal the chimney, clean the moss and lichen build-up off the roof, and we’re home-free. I delight in reporting that the home was very well built.

So, we took care of the rotten trim, sealed the massive chimney, and treated the moss build-up with ‘Wet and Forget’. The problem was that the moss build-up was so entrenched that I estimated that it would not just wash away over time after this treatment.

The homeowner was really concerned about the roof, and rightly so. I eased his concerns a bit by stating that the cedar roof is actually in great shape and has another decade of life ahead. Buh-hut, I also had to offer that roofs, windows, and heating systems are the 3 big ticket items that either turn away prospective buyers or take $ out of the seller’s pocket. He agreed 100% and asked what I could do about it. “Well, we could pressure wash the roof. It would tear off the old and dead skin cells, so to speak, and reveal the beauty underneath. Let’s exfoliate your shingles!” The reason we could pressure wash his shingles is because they are California- Hand – Splits. They’re about twice as thick- and irregularly shaped- as regular cedar shingles. He jumped on board, and then one-upped me, “Then, we could spray the ‘Wet and Forget’ on the roof to prevent future build-up.”

Sounds enough like a winning plan, now we just have to execute. When wet, the roof is like a ‘Slip and Slide’. We would have to use roofing harnesses and walk it with the pressure washing wand to clean it. We started a pool to see how many times I would slip and eat cedar shingles on day 1. Only twice, and they weren’t half bad. It was actually pretty rewarding to turn a client’s old roof into a new roof. But, it was mind-numbing work.  Not that the work I do is rocket science, but every now and then it’s nice to have a non-cerebral day. I only wish I had chosen a better last song. The last song I listened to in the truck was Def Leppard, now stuck in my head like the guy in the x-ray that didn’t see the javelin coming.

This back side of the garage roof took me about 5 hours to wash. This is after drying.

On day 1, it took me 5 hours to pressure wash a section of roof measuring approximately 30 feet wide by 16 feet up. It took an additional hour and a half to spray it with the “Wet and Forget” to keep moss and lichens from building up again. Remember to test out which tip to use with the sprayer so you don’t tear apart the soft cedar, and try not to spray uphill too much, this could cause leaks, obviously. Also, keep in mind that cedar turns gray in the sun, no matter what. So if you’re thinking it’s going to look like brandy spankin’ new forever, you may want to rethink that.

This is the front side of the garage after washing. We usually ask clients to at least shut their car doors before pressure washing above.

If you’re thinking about doing a project like this, please remember that a bit of pre-planning can go a long way. Don’t let Def Leppard pour sugar on you all day long! Enjoy.

 

By John Bradshaw

A Great Trick Learned from a Master

When I was a younger apprentice and journeyman carpenter, I always tried to work for the finest craftsmen I could, even when it meant leaving money on the table. I’m fortunate to have had 3 years of learning from one of the best carpenters I’ve seen, Brian Leavitt. This simple trick is straight from him.

Repairing cedar shakes can be a little tricky and time consuming. They are woven and overlapped and it can be a real chore to dissect them in a manner so as to be able to weave new ones back in properly. I’m not going to get into all of the particulars for cedar shake repairs, just offer a tip.

Once upon a time I was working under the tutelage of Brian and weaving cedar shakes back together on a wall right at eye level on a deck that’s used for lots of entertaining. Brian said, “Do you know how to slip a new shake in under an existing one and nail it so you don’t see nails on the face of it?”

“No, I don’t.” And as a matter of fact, I thought he was messing with me (I am super gullable). How could this be? Sliding a new shake in underneath the course directly above it and no face nails? No way.

Photo #1- This is the new shake to be installed. I have access to nail the left side of the shake at this point, but can still illustrate the trick for hiding nails with the left side of this shake.

Photo #2

Yes way. As in Photo #2, you’ll start by holding the new shake about a quarter of an inch lower than the rest of the same course of shakes you are trying to continue. Next, use some small tool like the mini pry-bar I used to hold out the existing shake that sits over the face of the new one to be nailed. Then, start your stainless siding nail up at a slight angle and as far up under the existing shake as you can. Drive the nail flush with the face of the shake. Use a nail set to help if needed.

When you finish the steps illustrated in photo #2, you’ll have what looks like photo #3. From here, all you have to do is hold a block of wood to the bottom edge of the new shake and tap it up with your hammer until the shake sits in line with the rest of the course as in photo #4.

Photo #3

Photo #4

 

 

 

 

 

 

You are now ready to abandon the old method of face nailing repaired cedar shakes, at least in high visibility spots. There are a couple of other things to take note of, though. First, this repair will be 100% complete when the cedar shakes are pressure washed to all match and hide the fact that any work was ever done. Second, the understanding of how to look at a cedar shake and determine which is the face and which face to nail to the wall is a dying, yet simple art that you should know.

Photo #5- Left face should be facing out.

In photo #5 the camera is looking down the butt edge of a shake. As seen here, the cup faces to the right. That means that the two edges of the piece of wood already curl to the right side forming a “cup”. We always install shakes so that the cup faces the wall. So from this view, the face on the right will face the wall. This is in anticipation of future wood movement. When wood gets wet and dries out, it cups to the side that it dries to. That means that a cedar shake’s 2 edges will turn away from the wall and cup toward the sun. If the shake was installed so that the cup was already facing that way, then this new movement will have such an impact on the shake that it will very likely split and cause the shake above it to pull away and move and just start it’s decline. This is very easy to avoid with just a fraction of a second of extra effort to look at the shake before installing it. You may now proceed well armed for battle, thanks to Brian.

 

By John Bradshaw

 

The Most Common Roof Error I See

Photo #1- This home in Portsmouth features an outside corner to the immediate left of the trash barrel that is exactly the scenario most likely to be done wrong. The inside corner that’s just a touch up the roofline is also a common culprit.

Photo #2- If you click on this image to enlarge it, you will see there is a gap between the copper step flashing going up the roof line and the horizontal copper apron flashing.

You may have learned by now that I’ve never been known for brevity. This blog post, however, should buck that trend a little bit. Why? Simple, because this common error is very easy to identify and resolve. So easy, in fact, that it doesn’t make much sense why these things are almost never done properly in the first place.

The scenario is this: Any time an out side wall corner or an inside wall corner comes down to intersect with a roof plane, assume it’s not flashed properly. Now, this does not mean that it leaks, necessarily. It may not leak due to a proper insurance layer of ice and water shield underneath the shingles. Conversely, the lack of water signs inside the corresponding portion of the home does not mean that it is not leaking. Wood, especially real wood as opposed to “particle board”, has the ability to absorb water, and then dry out. This can happen over and over again, as long as it can dry out. Or, The initial plywood and framing components that are coming in contact with the water that is infiltrating are sometimes not able to properly dry out, and thus rot. The components that lay below these “first absorbers” will get wet, but not necessarily beyond their saturation point. If the lower levels of wood are absorbing the water without exceeding their saturation point, the water may never make it to the drywall layer to display to the homeowner that damage is being done. This explains how a home can be taking on water without showing signs of it on the drywall, for instance.

Photo #3- Just a simple piece of lead flashing to transition between the planes.

What is the error at these corner/roof intersections that is causing these problems? Well, the lack of incorporating nice, wonderful, beautiful, malleable lead flashing into the mix. Am I in love with lead? Maybe just a trifle, but hey, what’s not to love? Standard aluminum step flashing runs up the abutting cheek wall that the roof shingles butt into. And aluminum can sometimes also be used to flash the siding down over the roofing at those wall planes that run parallel with the shingles. But what aluminum cannot ever do is to turn that corner seamlessly. Lead, however, has the ability to hit all these multiple planes seamlessly. Mmmmmmmmm.

Photo #4- This is a home in Hampton. Look how easy this stuff is to spot, yet home inspectors rarely pick up on it, even though this home has stained drywall in the garage underneath.

Photo #5- See the close-up of the hole there. Simple to identify a lack of lead.

It’s comical the things that I sometimes see. I will pull apart these layers to correct and end up seeing layer after layer after layer after layer of aluminum flashing. Each one torn right at the crux of the corner, every time. So, the predecessor’s solution for recognizing that the flashing was tearing: Keep throwing more layers at it. Awesome.

These are flaws that are easy to identify, simple to fix yourself if you’re comfortable on a roof, or inexpensive (unless there is widespread rot) to hire a professional to solve. It may only cost $200- $300 to un-weave some shingles, remove a corner board, install some lead flashing, install a new corner board, and weave the shingles back in. The most difficult challenge you may face might be finding the professional that knows how and when to incorporate lead flashing. Here’s a catchy little reminder when vetting a repair contractor: Find someone with a passion for flashin’. No. I won’t be quitting my day job any time soon.

I must leave you with one last tidbit of information. I mentioned that aluminum can usually be a good flashing choice for the planes that don’t need to wrap around a corner. When it’s not a suitable choice is when there is copper in the vicinity. Copper is ranked higher on the Galvanic Scale of Nobility and blah, blah, blah. Anyway, copper and water runoff from copper interact with aluminum and cause the aluminum to rot right out. That’s also why aluminum is no longer acceptable to use as a deck flashing, because pressure treated lumber is treated with copper. Now you’re prepared to go tackle this one, safely of course.

 

 

By John Bradshaw

 

 

Let’s Play Hide the Plywood

 

This is from my initial assessment.

In photo #2- Do you see the same problem I see?

I was called to a home in Rochester (actually I was emailed to visit this home)to examine recently revealed rot and offer solutions.This home has a second story roof overhang that is almost four feet deep. The homeowner started to find some problems when he ripped up the cement pad that was underneath the entire overhang. The columns had entirely rotted at the bottoms – the home was built before pressure treated wood- so we replaced them. We also replaced all of the fascias with pvc trim and installed seamless gutters and leafguards to manage the water. This proactive homeowner also found some soft and punky plywood after removing some of the siding, himself, to see what was going on.

In photo #2 you’ll see that the major problem I identified was the lack of elevation between the finish grade under the overhang and the wood framing, plywood, and siding. The current building code calls for a minimum of 8″ of exposed masonry between finish grade and framing and plywood. This is to protect the home from water damage and insect damage. With the extra wide roof overhang, there is little threat from water, but major threat from insects. The reason there was no prior insect damage was because the concrete pad was poured right up to the siding. When you’ve seen the devastating damage an underground colony of termites can silently wreak on the framing of a home, you evaluate these situations from a different angle.

In this drawing that I scanned and included with my original work proposal you’ll see 2 things: First, the solution that I’ve been using for a few years now to solve this type of problem; and second, my pre-K art skills not so proudly on display! The foam gasket and the bead of caulking work together to try to form an airtight seal to keep the bugs out. Additionally, we’re wrapping the bottom edge of the plywood with ice and water shield in order to hide the plywood from the insects. I’m no entymologist, but I assume that insects will be far less likely to begin nibbling away at petroleum based products like ice and water shield. The foam gasket must be buried under the ice and water shield. I’ve seen carpenter ants eat away an entire wall’s worth of 1/2″ foam board that lay directly under the siding. The only evidence remaining to prove that it ever existed was the foil facing.

Photo #3- We could stand to add some insulation, since the wall was opened up anyhow.

Photo #4- Insulation beefed up and ready to continue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #5

In photo #5, we applied the 7/16″ x 1″ wide foam gasket to the bottom edge of the back side of the plywood. We then began to wrap the bottom edge in ice and water shield. What I did was to gently pre-slice the paper on the back side of the ice and water shield so that I could stick it to the back of the ply and to the foam, but leave the protective paper on the part that will wrap up the front face of the ply.

In photo #6 you’ll see the back edge of the ply wrapped with ice and water shield up and over the foam gasket.

Photo #7

In photo # 7 this is the installation of said plywood panels. Notice I ran the ice and water shield past the first piece of ply, so that I could have good overlapping with the next piece. The process calls for smearing the bottom edge of the ply into a thick bead of high grade caulking. In this case, the local lumberyard didn’t carry Lexel brand caulking (in my opinion the most bad posterior caulking available), so that means 2 things: First, we used Phenoseal translucent caulking (goes on white and dries translucent); second, Ricci Lumber needs to think about opening a satellite location in Rochester, or I need to plan ahead and schedule for them to deliver my sundries along with the lumber order next time. Phenoseal is also amazing, it has my 110% confidence.

Photo #8

 

In photo # 8, note that it’s important to nail the bottom edge of the ply approximately every 6″. Also, remember to set the depth of the nail gun so that the nails don’t just blow 1/2 way through the plywood.

 

By John Bradshaw

Photo #9- Peel off the remaining paper and stick the ice and water shield to the face.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #10- Finish the prep with more ice and water shield tucked all the way underneath components that are directly above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #11- Pvc trimboard installation with hidden fasteners. We also installed proper flashing above the trimboard and replaced siding above that. All that’s left now is touch up paint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finished product from the road. The homeowner can finish his hardscaping now, sorry Rich.

In summary, when repairing rot in New England, or elsewhere, we must evaluate whether standard operating procedure will suffice. In this case, just nailing up plywood would handle the repair, but not protect the home for the long term. Invest the extra effort to think about and evaluate what forces will be working against the project in the future. Then, find or create the solution that will stand against these forces. It’s an investment you will not regret.