“Mahogany” Window Sill Repair

This is the condition of the pine trim repair after just a few years.

Many of our customers in Rollinsford, Portsmouth, Rye, Newcastle, and Rye Beach, NH, and South Berwick, ME have gorgeous historic homes. Some of these clients are open to the idea of pvc trim replacement for rot prone areas and some would prefer to stick with good old fashioned wood. What’s our official Meticulous position when asked if

The building envelope was well done. My predecessor had used a self adhering and self sealing membrane to keep the water from getting into the house. This is also what the bead of caulking looked like before we screwed the new sill nosing into place.

we prefer to use wood or pvc? Our answer is a resounding “Yes.” We would prefer to use wood or pvc, as opposed to…I don’t know, cardboard.

We can’t escape the understanding that there are many benefits of using pvc to replace rotten exterior trim. We also understand that today’s pine is absolutely NOT an option for longevity. But using pvc trim will never be the same experience, for a carpenter, as working with wood.

This is the profile of the new nosing. The rear notch at the top edge is to account for fitting around a lip on the window unit. The notch on the bottom rear edge is to fit over the siding, properly overlapping. The middle groove on the bottom edge is called a rain drip. This is to create an edge for the water to drip from before traveling further back to the siding.

We recently consulted with a great do it yourself homeowner in historic South Portsmouth, NH. Not long ago, he had replaced window sill nosings on the east face of his home that takes a brutal beating from mother nature, being only a couple dozen yards from the river. The work he did was with pine, unfortunately, so it didn’t take long to rot again. He wanted to stay away from pvc and asked what else we could offer. I suggested the solid but pricey “Mahogany.” I wrap this in quotations because I actually purchased a product called Red Meranti at Selectwood in Portsmouth. The way that I understand it, Red Meranti is not actual Mahogany, although is commonly referred to as Mahogany. Actual Mahogany is increasingly rare due to the strict forestry controls put in place after decades of over-harvesting in South America. Red Meranti hails primarily from Indonesia and Malaysia and is a nice solid, stable, insect and decay resistant choice for a sill nosing application, not to mention dense enough to not absorb tons of water. People often ask about cedar. I stay away from cedar in this application because cedar is a very soft wood and has an open grain structure. In my opinion, cedar readily absorbs water, even though it has the ability to resist rotting better than many species. Red cedar is much easier to work with because it’s lighter and softer and thus doesn’t require pre-drilling, but because sill nosings take a beating, I think Red Meranti’s density and close grain structure make it a superior choice.

Small trim screws through the face for holding power. There IS clear primer on this before installation, and notice the intentional bead of caulking to bond the trim to the bottom edge of the window.

In this instance, we were working on a wall system that was already well waterproofed. All we had to do was focus on doing the carpentry repair in a manner to stand the test of time… and the elements. Once we had test fitted the sill nosings to be splendid, we opted to use a higher-end primer that does a nice job of blocking the tannins from the Meranti from bleeding through the paint down the road. We chose to use a product called Trim Magic by manufacturer XIM. This bonding primer adheres very well and also does a nice job of blocking the tannin bleed. It goes on milky white and dries clear to milky white. The nosings don’t appear to be primed, but certainly are on all edges before installation.

We also tried to do the painter a favor and put a quick coat of white exterior paint inside of the bottom notch before installation makes this very difficult to do.

Today’s breeds of windows don’t really have a sloped window sill or a sill that notches out over the face of the siding underneath. So, even though the building envelope underneath was very well done, we still want to keep the water traveling out over the face of the siding. Because the bottom of the window unit is completely flat, we want to bond the new trim to the bottom edge of the window and stay bonded, so water doesn’t run in behind the nosing. This can’t be done by just a nice tight carpentry fit, so we have to leave a touch of a gap to bond the two with a tri-polymer caulking. Like I’ve said in the past, our favorite caulking is Lexel. By the way, did you know that tri-polymers are self-healing? This is because they stay so permanently flexible and gooey that if a bead of this caulking gets sliced somehow, the two ends will bond back together if they just touch. What’s next, are they going to start making cars that can parallel park themselves, or something?

Yes, we do prefer to do these repairs in wood or pvc. There are lots of pros and cons for each. Sometimes pvc is just a no-brainer; sometimes the pvc doesn’t make any sense. If we’re going to use wood, we just want to think about what species to use for the occasion. Cheery-O!

 

Common Repair in New England Architecture

 

Before.

One of the mainstays of quintessential New England architecture is the “Colonial” style home. We also see a terrific array of “Greek Revival” homes. Both of these styles may have some common architectural features, including cornice details. I suppose it may be prudent to start with a quick discussion about nomenclature. The “rake” line of a

Things are starting to pull away.

gable wall refers to the trim running up the angle of the roof. In this case, there is a rake overhang. The bottom portion of this particular rake overhang intersects with the fascia and soffit at the eave line and then “returns” back to the wall section away from the fascia and gutters at the eave line. This small and almost flat section is called a “rake return.”

After tucking the seamless lead flashing, we anchored the new frame in place.

The rake return is a detail that very commonly requires a little bit of TLC here in NE. Way back when, these details were often built using antique heart pine, exponentially denser and more stable than the garbage available today. It would have been painted in an

oil based paint that allows the wood to breathe and moisture to escape through the paint. Today’s latex paints don’t afford that luxury, but are much more environmentally friendly. Sometimes, they would cover the rake return with tin or even lead. This would usually last a century…not bad.

Ready for paint.

When Meticulous Remodeling is called upon to repair or rebuild a rake return on a historic home, such as the small roof sections here in Portsmouth, NH, there is generally a need to just rebuild it by the time we get there. If we rebuild it, we’ll always anchor the simple framing to the home and to the other framing members with screws, for greater holding power. There are 2 other very critical components to making sure

No more gaps, and with screws as fasteners, there shouldn’t be any in the future.

this project will be bulletproof for another century. First, we must use flashing that will seamlessly cover the entire surface. Second, we must make sure that this lead is seamlessly tucked up in behind the siding board at the house and tucked up in behind the rake soffit that comes down onto it.

For us, this is virtually impossible

Voila!

to do without removing the existing rake return structure to provide access for us to tuck this special order 16″ lead flashing in behind these adjacent planes without tearing it. Once the flashing is in, we’ll then slide the pre-built frame up underneath it and fasten it to the wall. Next, we add trim- in this case we used pvc trim boards. Finally, we might as well paint everything while we’re up there anyway.

Pigeons…enjoy!

PVC Window Trim Replacement

An overwheleming majority of New England homes will have to undergo some sort of rotten exterior trim replacement at some point. One of the most common needs is replacing rotten window casings and sill noses, especially on the north and east faces of a home. This article aims to instruct how to replace your exterior window trim with glued and screwed pvc window trim, in a manner that will withstand the elements.

This Portsmouth home needed rotten exterior trim replaced with something that would hold up, being just a few feet from the river.

This home in Portsmouth, NH was in need of these repairs. Although I have no photos, the first thing to be done is remove the existing window casings and sill nose, gently, so as to not destroy the existing jambs, etc.. I use my Fein reciprocating saw to slice through these components, for easier removal. The sill nose must be trimmed flush with the jambs.

After measuring for the new trim and cutting and labeling the new pieces, it’s time to begin the assembly. The first thing I do is to assemble the bottom of each side window casing to the sill nose. In this case the bevel angle is 15 degrees. The glue we use for pvc welding sets up relatively quickly (in about 5 minutes), so we’ll want to start our screws before applying the glue. Because the sill nose (made by Royal Moldings) is only about 1-1/8″ thick, we can screw from the underside of the nosing into the casing. The rest of the pvc trim is Azek brand.

Make sure not to use so much glue that it oozes out.

 

 

 

 

 

This pvc glue also fits nicely into a carpenter’s tool pouch when on a ladder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the solvent we use for cleaning off any excess glue. Clean it quickly because the glue will “melt” into the face of the trim after a few moments. This is also the cleaner we use for wiping down the trim after final installation, cleaning our dirty paw prints off of it!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Window sill and bottom of casings.

 

 

 

 

 

Predrilling the pockets.

For screwing the tops of the casings together, we rely on what’s called a “Kreg” brand pocket screwing kit from the back side of the casings. We first drill the pocket holes for the screws on the back of the side casings. Next, we make sure we’re using the right trims in the right spots, that’s why we mark such as “TR” to mean Top Right corner of the window. Now start the screws into their pocket holes before applying glue. Glue it up, and then use the special clamp and a backer block to protect the face of the trim during clamping. Screw it together and that one’s done!

We now have a pre-assembled window trim package ready to install.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next, we must prep the face of the window jambs and sill nose before applying the new trim. We use Lexel brand adhesive caulk exclusively for anything that has to hold up to the elements. It has tremendous adhesion, uv resistance, and flexibility. The flexibility is key. You don’t want to use an epoxy paste or

Notice we don’t pre-paint the sill. We want the adhesive and the new trim to bond to solid wood, not to a layer of paint or primer.

anything that won’t move and expand and contract with the movement of the vinyl and wood components. We apply this liberally to the sill nose and bottom portion of the jambs.

 

 

By making sure that there is total caulking squeeze out along the entire seam, we can ensure that the joint will keep water out.

It’s time to install the trim. We use screws for greater holding power to stay bonded tight to the wood. The screws we use are made for pvc trim. They use a special driver to recess the screws into the face of the trim. Then you gently tap a matching pvc plug into the hole, and the hole has vanished! We clean up all the excess caulking using mineral spirits and a clean rag. Remember not to leave solvent soaked rags bunched up

These are the plugs.

in the sun or high heat (like an attic during the summer). The rags will spontaneously combust. Instead, drape the wet rags to dry immediately after use.

Wait, where did the plugs go?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This is the final product.

Once all the plugs are in, we wipe down the trim with the Goof Off, and then install the storm window and it’s complete. The total time for this project (an easy first story window) is under 3 hours. The total cost for this window was around $200. In this case, the critical joint between the new sill nose and the existing sill is hidden from the majority of the elements behind the storm window. If there is no storm window, I recommend checking the integrity of this joint and re-caulking if necessary every few years, just to err on the side of caution. I warranty this project for ten years, but you can expect it to last much longer.

By John Bradshaw

 

Let’s Play Hide the Plywood

 

This is from my initial assessment.

In photo #2- Do you see the same problem I see?

I was called to a home in Rochester (actually I was emailed to visit this home)to examine recently revealed rot and offer solutions.This home has a second story roof overhang that is almost four feet deep. The homeowner started to find some problems when he ripped up the cement pad that was underneath the entire overhang. The columns had entirely rotted at the bottoms – the home was built before pressure treated wood- so we replaced them. We also replaced all of the fascias with pvc trim and installed seamless gutters and leafguards to manage the water. This proactive homeowner also found some soft and punky plywood after removing some of the siding, himself, to see what was going on.

In photo #2 you’ll see that the major problem I identified was the lack of elevation between the finish grade under the overhang and the wood framing, plywood, and siding. The current building code calls for a minimum of 8″ of exposed masonry between finish grade and framing and plywood. This is to protect the home from water damage and insect damage. With the extra wide roof overhang, there is little threat from water, but major threat from insects. The reason there was no prior insect damage was because the concrete pad was poured right up to the siding. When you’ve seen the devastating damage an underground colony of termites can silently wreak on the framing of a home, you evaluate these situations from a different angle.

In this drawing that I scanned and included with my original work proposal you’ll see 2 things: First, the solution that I’ve been using for a few years now to solve this type of problem; and second, my pre-K art skills not so proudly on display! The foam gasket and the bead of caulking work together to try to form an airtight seal to keep the bugs out. Additionally, we’re wrapping the bottom edge of the plywood with ice and water shield in order to hide the plywood from the insects. I’m no entymologist, but I assume that insects will be far less likely to begin nibbling away at petroleum based products like ice and water shield. The foam gasket must be buried under the ice and water shield. I’ve seen carpenter ants eat away an entire wall’s worth of 1/2″ foam board that lay directly under the siding. The only evidence remaining to prove that it ever existed was the foil facing.

Photo #3- We could stand to add some insulation, since the wall was opened up anyhow.

Photo #4- Insulation beefed up and ready to continue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #5

In photo #5, we applied the 7/16″ x 1″ wide foam gasket to the bottom edge of the back side of the plywood. We then began to wrap the bottom edge in ice and water shield. What I did was to gently pre-slice the paper on the back side of the ice and water shield so that I could stick it to the back of the ply and to the foam, but leave the protective paper on the part that will wrap up the front face of the ply.

In photo #6 you’ll see the back edge of the ply wrapped with ice and water shield up and over the foam gasket.

Photo #7

In photo # 7 this is the installation of said plywood panels. Notice I ran the ice and water shield past the first piece of ply, so that I could have good overlapping with the next piece. The process calls for smearing the bottom edge of the ply into a thick bead of high grade caulking. In this case, the local lumberyard didn’t carry Lexel brand caulking (in my opinion the most bad posterior caulking available), so that means 2 things: First, we used Phenoseal translucent caulking (goes on white and dries translucent); second, Ricci Lumber needs to think about opening a satellite location in Rochester, or I need to plan ahead and schedule for them to deliver my sundries along with the lumber order next time. Phenoseal is also amazing, it has my 110% confidence.

Photo #8

 

In photo # 8, note that it’s important to nail the bottom edge of the ply approximately every 6″. Also, remember to set the depth of the nail gun so that the nails don’t just blow 1/2 way through the plywood.

 

By John Bradshaw

Photo #9- Peel off the remaining paper and stick the ice and water shield to the face.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #10- Finish the prep with more ice and water shield tucked all the way underneath components that are directly above.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo #11- Pvc trimboard installation with hidden fasteners. We also installed proper flashing above the trimboard and replaced siding above that. All that’s left now is touch up paint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finished product from the road. The homeowner can finish his hardscaping now, sorry Rich.

In summary, when repairing rot in New England, or elsewhere, we must evaluate whether standard operating procedure will suffice. In this case, just nailing up plywood would handle the repair, but not protect the home for the long term. Invest the extra effort to think about and evaluate what forces will be working against the project in the future. Then, find or create the solution that will stand against these forces. It’s an investment you will not regret.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common Rot Repairs Using PVC Trim Boards

While having the pleasure of working in a beautiful neighborhood in Newcastle, NH recently, I was approached, on separate occasions, by 2 friendly neighbors. Both of these gentlemen were astute “Do -It- Yourselfers” in want of information. All of the homes in the neighborhood were built about 20 – 25 years ago and are beginning to have some of the same issues. They’ve got roofs that are starting to show minor problems, roof boots that have dried out and cracked, windows that have exceeded their serviceable life, and generalized exterior rot. Both neighbors seemed to want to see how we handle some of these things, and determine for themselves whether there is anything of value they might be able to take from it.

Because I want this blog and this website to be a resource, I figure I might as well share my approach to some of these things that people seem interested in learning about. In this case,

This is the bottom trim molding before.

the front door threshold had been replaced at some point with a pine threshold. It rotted at the corners, where the storm door side tracks sit on top of it. Also, the door surround had been patched with new pine in places, and it too was in need of attention. Originally, I didn’t think about writing a blog for this project, so the beginning pictures could have been better.

 

 

 

In this third picture, you’ll see the short section of pine that was used for a previous patch. The predecessor chose clear pine instead of primed finger jointed. Very conscientious. He/she also cut an angle at the top of the piece which created what we call a scarf joint, or some would call a weather cut. This is important. The patch had also been primed on all sides, including the scarf joint at the top. This is even more important when using wood.

But the patch, beginning at the top right corner, had begun it’s rapid descent down the drain anyhow. How come? Well briefly, (I’ll save the real meat and potatoes of this one for another blog post) because pine available today for exterior projects is complete garbage. Be as conscientious as you want, it’s still going to fail prematurely, everytime.

Step one: Drive screw with special driver (no pre-drilling).

So,I chose to replace these vulnerable components with pvc board and trim. Nothing comes without it’s pricetag, however. And these products have their pricey tag.

Additionally, they must be used with the utmost care and attention to detail, or suffer the wrath of buyer’s remorse.

The brand I use is Azek. A 1 x 12

Step two: Set pvc plug.

comes 18′ long and can shrink as much as 3/4″ lengthwise depending on ambient temperature. Typical wood boards shrink and expand with changes in

moisture, and in greatest fluctuation across their width (the 5-1/2″ width for a 1 x 6). Pvc boards shrink and expand with thermal changes, and in greatest fluctuation along their length (18′ for a typical board that is uncut). Therefore it can be entirely expected that if you install an 18′ 1 x 12 that butts into 2 perpendicular wood surfaces on an 80 degree day in the sun, and then come back to visit (this is where being a remodeling carpenter with repeat customers becomes priceless) during November on a

Final step: Gently tap flush with hammer.

40 degree day, you will probably see a gap at each end approaching 3/8 of an inch!!!!

But, with a whole bunch of awesomeness (I’m actually dusting off the tops of my shoulders while typing) these problems can be averted. I’ve built a deck, during the summer, with 1 x 8 trimboards totaling 39 feet joined together. I went back for another stage of construction during the winter, and none of the joints had opened a whisker.

I was very reluctant to use the super-spectacular new virtually invisible fastening method for these products, but with a bit of coaching from some of the younger guys that were more open to these things, I fell head over heels. The screws are made by Cortex. You just sink ‘em deep with no pre-drilling, and then tap in a pvc plug with your hammer. Boom! Nothing ever happened here. Stainless finish nails can sheer off under the right expansion and contraction conditions.

The glue we use for pvc joinery.

What about glue? We should use the Azek brand glue that Azek specifies, right? Wrong-o! This pvc is cellular pvc, similar to being blown up with air like a marshmallow. It’s not dense like pvc pipe. So, Azek specifies a light body pvc cement because it will not “bite into” their trim board too much and thus compromise it, according to them. I’ve seen this proprietary glue fail time after timeĀ  (could I please get Cyndi Lauper out of my head now!). I use a medium body pvc cement, preferably in a squeeze tube to fit neatly in my tool pouch. It “bites into” the trim board enough to hold the joint through the changes in seasons. This allows me to create exterior trimwork that water will never have the opportunity to infiltrate. It can join layers of trim on adjacent planes and at perpendicular angles. A trim product that doesn’t absorb water and adhesives and techniques that ensure tight joinery for years to come. I mean, what’s next? Are they gonna come out with commercial free radio stations or something?

Joining the upper wood with the new, lower pvc. Notice the Gorilla glue squeeze out.

The next thing to think about, with regards to this repair project, is joining the new pvc trim patch to the existing wood trim layers. I chose to save the upper portions of the wood trim that weren’t compromised. they will be out of the snow and rain, and I know we can elevate our game to keep water out of these joints. First, the lower product that would be catching all the water will be pvc. Second, we will use relatively small pieces for these patches so that the percentages that they will shrink with thermal changes will have a miniscule practical effect. Third, when we bond them to the wood we will use the best adhesive ever for this application…next time. I loathe making mistakes, and both times I’ve had a hard time reconciling it (laugh with me). However, I chose Gorilla brand polyurethane glue for this particular application, and then second guessed myself. To satisfy the second guessing, I did a test joint with a piece of wood joining to a piece of pvc trim. The next day it was no good. The glue didn’t bite into the pvc andĀ  I was able to force the joint apart with some effort. One of the reasons that I chose this glue, however, was because of it’s expansive properties. The other was because of it’s insane ability to bond to wood. Boil it down, and the glue I chose did not properly bond the two pieces. It did, however, expand to fill the entire joint 100% and form an unbreakable bond with the upper wood part of the joint. So, the wood end grain is well sealed forever, and the pvc trim board underneath it should not contract beyond a hairline. Lovely.

For the longer pvc trim boards, I made new nose pieces at the top that sit underneath the wood trim (For this whole paragraph, I have no pics…this blog post was an afterthought). I applied a heavy bead of Lexel caulk and then screwed these small pieces into the upper wood trim. I then applied a nice bead of pvc cement to the top butt edge of the long pvc board before butting it into this small pvc trim detail. Because we used the proper fasteners and adhesives, this perpendicular joint will not fail.

It’s alright to use stainless finish nails when using small components. Further, the nails are only going to be carrying the load until the glue sets up in five minutes or so.

The last thing to remember is to account for whether or not your pvc trim is going to be painted. It doesn’t have to be, but machine marks must be eliminated. They leave tiny pits that allow algae and mold to build up in. Raw edges, if unpainted and unsanded, turn almost black with these growths. Finely sand or paint all exposed cut edges. Also, paint doesn’t stick to sharp corners, so ease the outside corners of your work with a piece of sandpaper. Lastly, paint doesn’t stick to shiny pvc trim very well. I know, your painter and paint retailer will contradict me. That’s fine. I’ve been in the position to come back around to a project 6 months later, to see how the paint held up. The right paint, according to the manufacturer, didn’t stick. I now recommend gently scuffing the entire pvc surfaces to be painted to remove the “shine” from the board, beforehand. It is a price to pay, but remember that the new pvc trim will hold paint FAR longer than wood will, due to it’s moisture stability.

Finished product…before being painted to match.

By John Bradshaw